It’s time for another one from the archives, this time from a recipe book that accompanied the Tower Pressure Cooker sold throughout the early to mid-90s. This week’s Retro-Recipe Revival sees us ushering in Autumn in delicious, tasty style – it’s Sage & Nutmeg Butternut Squash Risotto.

Recommended appliance

Tower 6 Litre/22cm Stainless Steel Pressure Cooker

Total time to table: 16 minutes

Total Cost Per Serving: £1.58

Contains Nuts? No

Suitable for Vegetarians? Yes

Serves: 4

Ingredients

  • 750g butternut squash (diced)
  • x2 tablespoons olive oil
  • x2 sprigs sage (leaves removed)
  • x4 garlic cloves (sliced)
  • 360g arborio rice
  • x75ml white wine
  • x4 cups water
  • x2 tsp sea salt
  • x1 tsp nutmeg (freshly ground)

Preparation

  • Slice the squash in half and peel with a potato peeler. Using a spoon, scoop out the seeds and discard (or save to roast later). The Tower 6 Piece Cerasafe Utensil Set and Carousel includes a peeler as well as a serving spoon, perfect for scooping out the seeds of your squash.
  • Add the olive oil to the pre-heated pressure cooker and sprinkle in the sage leaves and garlic. When the sage leaves start to look polka-dotted and crispy, remove a few and set aside on a paper towel to use as garnish.
  • Add just enough squash cubes to cover the base of the cooker, and coat them with the sage, garlic and olive oil.
  • Leave the cubes undisturbed for about 4 minutes while one side of the cubes brown and caramelize. If the garlic is starting to burn lift it up onto a squash cube.
  • Push the squash aside, add the rice and let it toast for a couple of minutes.
  • Add the wine and let it evaporate completely before adding the rest of the squash cubes, water and salt. Mix well.
  • Close and lock the lid of the pressure cooker. Turn the heat up to high and when the cooker indicates it has reached high pressure, lower the heat and cook for 6 minutes.
  • When time is up, open the cooker by releasing the pressure through the valve.

Serving

Mix well and serve each dish with a fresh dusting of nutmeg and reserved fried sage leaves.
If you’d like to try this recipe or others from the Retro Recipe Revival series, head over to our Pressure Cookers and Food Preparation pages before you get started. There you’ll find all sorts of useful appliances (in addition to those mentioned here) that can help you rustle up these fantastic meals in minutes!

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